Flowers, flowers everywhere! Summertime brings us the plethora of wildflowers we see growing all around us. They all vary in shapes and sizes, colors and structures. With some research however, we can identify them and learn even more about them than just their beauty, such as their ovary position and flower symmetry! Keep scrolling below to learn more about these complex and beautiful wildflowers!

Floral Analysis

 

 

Flower #1

This flower was found here: North Country trail, in a tall grass patch

It is on page 220 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Queen Anne’s Lace/ Wild carrot          Scientific name: Daucus carota         Family: Apiaceae

Corolla:  number of petals  5            separate or  fused?  separate

Calyx:    number of sepals  5            separate or fused?  separate

Adroecium: number of stamens  5            separate, fused or arranged in any special way?  separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 2)  Syncarpous
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)  Two distinct chambers visible

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?  Epigynous, inferior ovary

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?  Zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: bracts underneath the flowers, umbel inflorescence

 

 

Flower #2

This flower was found here: North Country trail, forested but grassy area, slightly swamp-like

It is on page 216 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Wild live-forever            Scientific name: Hylotelephium telephium/ Sedum telephium 

Family: Crassulaceae

Corolla:  number of petals  5            separate or  fused?  separate

Calyx:    number of sepals  5            separate or fused?  separate

Adroecium: number of stamens  5            separate, fused or arranged in any special way?  separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 5)  Apocarpous
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)  Separate segments visible

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?  Hypogynous, superior ovary

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?  Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features:  corymb inflorescence, very thick and almost waxy leaves

 

 

Flower #3

This flower was found here: Whetstone Park, in the undergrowth of a semi-wooded area

It is on page 248 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Garden phlox            Scientific name: Phlox paniculata            Family: Polemoniaceae

Corolla:  number of petals  5            separate or  fused?  separate

Calyx:    number of sepals  5            separate or fused?  fused

Adroecium: number of stamens  5            separate, fused or arranged in any special way?  separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 1)  Unicarpellate
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)  Only one pistil present

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?  Epigynous, inferior ovary

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?  Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: grow in clusters at the top of pedicel, opposite leaves

 

Flower #4

This flower was found here: Whetstone Park, surrounded by shrubs and small trees, semi-moist environment

It is on page 214 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Swamp rose mallow            Scientific name: Hibiscus moscheutos            Family: Malvaceae

Corolla:  number of petals  5            separate or  fused?  separate

Calyx:    number of sepals  5            separate or fused?  fused

Adroecium: number of stamens  many (∞)            separate, fused or arranged in any special way?  along a column in the center of the flower

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 5)  Syncarpous
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)  Five fused styles with stigmas on the end can be seen

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?  Hypogynous, superior ovary

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?  Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: reproductive column in the center includes pistil and is surrounded by many pollen coated anthers

 

 

Flower Identification

 

 

Flower #1

This flower was found: North Country trail, along a patch of grasses/trees

Common names: Goldenrod(s)

Scientific name: Solidago

Family: Asteraceae

Distinctive features: bright golden yellow color, alternate leaves

Interesting things: Bees, butterflies, wasps, and some beetles are very attracted to it (US Forest Service).

 

 

Flower #2

This flower was found: Whetstone park, in a protected prairie area

Common names: Black-eyed Susan

Scientific name: Rudbeckia hirta

Family: Asteraceae

Distinctive features: bright yellow color of petal with black centers

Interesting things: They bloom from June – October and can grow over 3 feet tall (The Old Farmer’s Almanac).

 

Flower #3

This flower was found: Whetstone park, in a protected prairie area

Common names: White heath aster

Scientific name: Symphyotrichum ericoides

Family: Asteraceae

Distinctive features: look similar to daisies, but smaller. Thin, long petals are rounded at the tips

Interesting things: White heath aster is considered endangered in Tennessee, but an invasive weed in Nebraska (USDA).

 

 

Flower #4 

This flower was found: Whetstone park, on the edge of a creek

Common names: Woodland sunflower

Scientific name: Helianthus divaricatus

Family: Asteraceae

Distinctive features: bright yellow petals, leaves are opposite

Interesting things: Will often grow in colonies due to a system of rhizomes (modified roots) beneath the soil (Gardenia).